May Avenue, Canvey Island, Essex, SS8 7HF

admin@lubbinspark.essex.sch.uk

01268 697 181

Mrs C. Ireson

Lubbins Park Primary Academy

Engaged Resilient Enthusiastic Reflective Independent

Child Sexual Exploitation

CHILD SEXUAL EXPLOITATION: WARNING SIGNS AND VULNERABILITIES CHECKLIST

Source: The Office of the Children’s Commissioner (2012) Interim Report - Inquiry into Child Sexual Exploitation in Group and Gangs.

Evidence available points to several factors that can increase a child’s vulnerability to being sexually exploited. 

The following are typical vulnerabilities in children prior to abuse:

  • Living in a chaotic or dysfunctional household (including parental substance use, domestic violence, parental mental health issues, parental criminality)
  • History of abuse (including familial child sexual abuse, risk of forced marriage, risk of ‘honour’-based violence, physical and emotional abuse and neglect)
  • Recent bereavement or loss
  • Gang association either through relatives, peers or intimate relationships (in cases of gang associated CSE only)
  • Attending school with young people who are sexually exploited
  • Learning disabilities
  • Unsure about their sexual orientation or unable to disclose sexual orientation to their families
  • Friends with young people who are sexually exploited
  • Homeless
  • Lacking friends from the same age group
  • Living in a gang neighbourhood
  • Living in residential care
  • Living in hostel, bed and breakfast accommodation or a foyer
  • Low self-esteem or self-confidence
  • Young carer

The following signs and behaviour are generally seen in children who are already being sexually exploited:

  • Missing from home or care
  • Physical injuries
  • Drug or alcohol misuse
  • Involvement in offending
  • Repeat sexually-transmitted infections, pregnancy and terminations
  • Absent from school
  • Evidence of sexual bullying and/or vulnerability through the internet and/or social networking sites
  • Estranged from their family
  • Receipt of gifts from unknown sources
  • Recruiting others into exploitative situations
  • Poor mental health
  • Self-harm
  • Thoughts of or attempts at suicide

Evidence shows that any child displaying several vulnerabilities from the above lists should be considered to be at high risk of sexual exploitation. If you identify a child who you consider to be suffering from or at high risk of CSE, it is important that the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) in school is informed so that they can contact Children’s Services.

Essex Police Guidance on CSE